Home » YOUR JARGON BUSTER FOR CAR REPAIRS

YOUR JARGON BUSTER FOR CAR REPAIRS

YOUR JARGON BUSTER FOR CAR REPAIRS

Ever taken your car to the garage and found yourself just smiling and nodding at all the strange words used to diagnose your car?

Car jargon can be pretty difficult to decipher if you don’t have a clue about the inner workings of your vehicle. Well, fear not. We’ve designed this simple cheat sheet, so you know what you’re talking about when you next take your car to the garage… Brake Calipers, Brake Discs and Brake Pads The caliper is the part of the brake that squeezes the disc and slows the rotation of the wheels when you brake. The disc is a rotating metal part that is fixed so that it always turns with the wheel and in conjunction with the caliper, slows the wheel’s rotation. The pads are the part of the caliper that rub smoothly against the metal brake disc when the brakes are applied. These gradually wear down, making them the part of the brake that most commonly needs replacing. Cam Belt This is a rubber belt that drives the moving parts inside the top of the engine. They need to be replaced at specified intervals, which will be detailed in your service manual. This is very important because if it breaks, it can cause huge damage inside the engine. Catalytic Converter If your car was built after 1993, it will have a catalytic converter fitted as part of the exhaust. Their job is to reduce harmful emissions like carbon monoxide and turn it into less harmful gases or vapour. These are generally very reliable but be warned, if it does fail it can be expensive to replace. Engine Oil Engine oil lubricates the fast-moving metal parts in your engine to stop them from overheating or wearing out too fast. Without oil, they will rapidly overheat and ‘seize up’ – which means that the metal parts will expand in the heat and jam together. This is why you should check oil levels regularly.
vauxhall
Suspension The suspension is a complicated spring setup found at each corner of your car. They allow the wheels to move independently of the chassis and therefore smooth out any bumps or unevenness in the road. Tread This refers to the patterns cut into the rubber of your tyres to provide grip and it can be dangerous if the tread wears down too low, particularly in wet weather. It’s a legal requirement in the UK to have at least 1.6mm tread depth. When you buy a used car from a trusted dealer like Shelbourne Motors, all of these components will have been tested for you so you know you’re driving away in a quality car that won’t cost a fortune in repairs a few years down the line. But if anything does come up in the car’s lifespan, this cheat sheet will help you decode all the technical jargon! *This article was sourced for DadvWorld.com | I have literally zero clue about cars as many of you will know. Given the laugh we’ve had with cars over the last 6 months I thought this post would be great to share with you! Thanks for reading, David 🙂

I’M OVER ON INSTAGRAM IF YOU FANCY COMING OVER TO CHAT! YOU CAN ALSO KEEP UP WITH EVERYTHING DADVWORLD ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE 🙂

Follow:
SHARE:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.